Thursday, September 17, 2020

Rule of 6 Guidance no.4 - Church of England official guidance (part 1)

 Finally we have some clarification from the CofE on how the Rule of 6 affects church life. As expected, it has pretty much no impact on Sunday worship. The key area was always going to be small groups and social/outreach activities. 

Here is todays updated guidance, with selected FAQs. This important rider is also given:

The Church of England continues to engage with the Government seeking clarification on a number of areas.
We anticipate further updates in the next few days with further additions to the FAQs and we also continue to review the downloadable guidance papers which will be updated accordingly. All updates will be notified at the top of this page.

The Government has introduced new regulations making it illegal for groups of more than six people to meet, unless covered by exemptions.

The intention is to limit the spread of the virus by minimising close physical contact as much as possible. When deciding whether to proceed with an activity, depending on local circumstances, please bear this principle in mind.

Areas covered by exemptions to the ‘rule of six’ include work, children’s activities and charitable services.

There is also an exemption that covers places of worship making it possible for more than six people to gather for acts of communal worship. However, it is not a blanket exemption for any activity in a place of worship.

The advice below is provided to assist local churches in their planning and decision making.

It is everyone’s responsibility to comply with the law. This guidance is designed to help those who have responsibility for organising gatherings, to ensure they comply with the law and protect parishioners and the public, especially those most vulnerable to the effects of COVID-19.

We acknowledge and share the sadness many are feeling at not being able to meet together as we used to do. We prayerfully and confidently look forward to the day when we can all meet together again.

 

FAQs

The rule of six

HOW DOES THE NEW 'RULE OF SIX' AFFECT CHURCH SERVICES?

Public worship can continue. There is an exemption that covers places of worship making it possible for more than six people to gather for acts of communal worship. However, it is not a blanket exemption. People must not be part of a group of more than six unless they are from the same household or support bubble.

ARE PLACES OF WORSHIP EXEMPT FROM THE 'RULE OF SIX'?

There is an exemption that covers places of worship making it possible for more than six people to gather there.  The exemption covers church services and as well as some other activities that take place in church buildings.

However, it is not a blanket exemption. People must not be part of a group of more than six unless they are from the same household or support bubble.

CAN CHURCHES OPEN FOR INDIVIDUAL PRAYER?

Since 15 June, the Government has allowed access to places of worship for individual prayer and funerals. See our guidance on individual prayer.

Individual prayer should be individual. People must not be part of a group of more than six unless they are from the same household or support bubble.

If your church is opening for Individual prayer or public worship, please complete a risk assessment.

CAN CHURCHES HOLD SERVICES OF WORSHIP?

Since the 4th of July 2020, the Government has allowed public worship to resume. New regulations came into force on 14th of September 2020 limiting gatherings to no more than six people. Places of worship, alongside other COVID-secure premises, are exempt, meaning that the number of people able to attend services depends on how many can safely be accommodated, observing appropriate physical distancing and hygiene measures.

However people must not be part of a group of more than six unless they are from the same household or support bubble.

CAN BIBLE STUDY GROUPS OR HOME GROUPS NOW MEET IN PERSON?

A group can meet in someone’s home as long as there are no more than six people in the house in total, including those not taking part in the group at that time.

Groups can meet on church premises under the same conditions as apply to services of worship – for example, people attending must not be part of a group of more than six unless they are from the same household or support bubble.

However, Government guidance states:

“However, for activities and social groups where there is a significant likelihood of groups mixing and socialising ( and where it will be difficult to prevent mingling and therefore breaking the law) should not take place in a community facility.”

Please take this into consideration.

CAN CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE’S ACTIVITIES START AGAIN?

Yes, children’s activities being organised by the place of worship alongside or within a service or at other times during the week should follow principles in the general guidance from the Department for Education on Out of School Settings.

In outline, these recommend that, to reduce the risk of transmission, children and young people who attend should be kept in small, consistent groups, and of no more than fifteen children and at least one staff member. Children should be assigned to a particular class or group and should then stay in those consistent groups for future sessions and avoid mixing with other groups in your setting.

If possible, those attending should practise physical distancing in line with the government’s current guidance. As the risk of transmission is considerably lower outdoors, providers who normally run sessions indoors should consider whether they are able to do so safely outside on their premises.

The guidance document on children and young people’sactivities has not been amended since 24th August, and still states that no church pre-school groups can restart. But see the top of this page - I would expect an update to this document soon.  

Wednesday, September 16, 2020

Rule of 6 Guidance 3 - 'Support Groups'

 Some of the documents I cited last week were updated on Monday. I'm especially interested in what the new covid guidance says about 'Support Groups', as this touches on a lot of what our churches do away from Sunday worship. 

Here's what the guidance (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-outbreak-faqs-what-you-can-and-cant-do/coronavirus-outbreak-faqs-what-you-can-and-cant-do) says about them (commentary in italics):

2.10 When can I gather in groups of more than 6?

If you live in a household with more than 6 people, you can continue to gather in and attend all settings together. This same applies for your support bubbles. All venues should continue to accomodate groups larger than 6 who live together or are in the same support bubble to gather in and use their services and venues.

There are exceptions where groups can be larger than 6 people, including:

  • for work, or the provision of voluntary or charitable services
  • registered childcare, education or training
  • supervised activities provided for children, including wraparound care, youth groups and activities, and children’s playgroups
  • providing support to a vulnerable person
  • providing emergency assistance, and to avoid injury or illness or to escape risk of harm
  • for arrangements where children do not live in the same household as both their parents
  • fulfilling a legal obligation such as attending court or jury service
  • weddings and civil partnership ceremonies and receptions – up to 30 people, in a public place
  • funerals – up to 30 people. This does not include wakes, other than for religious ceremonial purposes.
  • other religious and belief-based life cycle ceremonies – up to 30 people, in a public place. This only covers the ceremonies, and does not include celebrations of these events.
  • organised sport or exercises classes or licensed outdoor physical activity. This does not include informal sport or fitness activity with family or friends – this must be limited to a group of 6.
  • elite sporting competition and training
  • support groups – formally organised groups to provide mutual aid, therapy or any other form of support. This includes support to victims of crime, recovering addicts, new parents, people with long-term illnesses, those facing issues relating to their sexuality or gender, and those who have suffered bereavement.
  • protests – if organised in compliance with COVID-19 Secure guidance

Where a group includes someone covered by one of these exemptions, they are not counted as part of the gatherings limit. This means, for example, that a tradesperson can go into a household of six without breaching the limit if they are there for work.(the same wording is replicated here, in guidance on 'meeting with others safely' https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-meeting-with-others-safely-social-distancing/coronavirus-covid-19-meeting-with-others-safely-social-distancing)

2.11 Does this mean that no more than six people can be in a pub, restaurant or place of worship at once?

Venues following COVID-19 Secure guidelines can host more than 6 people in total, but no one should visit in a group of greater than 6 (unless you are all from the same household or support bubble). When you visit one of these places, such as a pub, shop, leisure venue, restaurant or place of worship you should:

  • follow the limits on the number of other people you should meet with as a group (it will be illegal to be in group of more than six from outside of your household or support bubble)
  • avoid mingling with anyone outside the group you are with, even if you see other people you know
  • provide your contact details to the organiser so that you can be contacted if needed by the NHS Test and Trace programme

2.12 Can I have a celebration for significant or ceremonial life events, other than weddings?

The legal gatherings limit of six people does not apply to standalone religious and belief-based life cycle ceremonies, such as christenings and bar/batmitzvahs. You can have up to 30 people at these events, provided they take place in a public place. This includes events to mark or celebrate a significant milestone in a person’s life, according to their religion or belief, such as events to celebrate a person’s birth (other than a birthday) or coming of age; or to mark a person’s death or celebrate their life following their death.

This does not include celebrations of these events - receptions are only permitted for weddings and civil partnerships.

You should socially distance wherever possible from people you do not live with (or have formed a support bubble with).

the exception here for life cycle ceremonies isn't extended to general cyclical ceremonies, such as Remembrance, Christmas, (plus all the lesser festivals)

3.10 Can I pray in a place of worship?

Yes, places of worship will stay open for services and communal prayer in line with guidance for reopening Places of Worship.

Places of worship can stay open for services for more than 6 people. However, you must not mingle in a group of more than 6 people (other than with people you live with or have formed a support bubble with).

Strict adherence to social distancing is strongly advised and a distance of 2 metres (or 1 metre with additional COVID-19 Secure measures in place) should be kept from people you do not live with wherever possible.

my reading of this is that you can have a prayer meeting in a church building, but people must be kept in groups of no more than 6 with no mingling across groups. 

3.18 Can I go to my support group?

Some types of support group are exempt from the legal gatherings limit.

Support groups can can take place in gatherings of any number in a public place, if the support group is organised by a business, a charitable, benevolent or philanthropic institution or a public body to provide mutual aid, therapy or any other form of support to its members or those who attend its meetings (my emphasis). This includes, but is not limited to, providing support:

  • to victims of crime (including domestic abuse)
  • to those with, or recovering from, addictions (including alcohol, narcotics or other substance addictions) or addictive patterns of behaviour
  • to new and expectant parents
  • to those with, or caring for persons with, any long-term illness, disability or terminal condition or who are vulnerable
  • to those facing issues related to their sexuality or identity including those living as lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender
  • to those who have suffered bereavement

This is an exemption to the legal gatherings limit of six people.

Support groups not covered by this exemption can still take place if they do not breach the new gatherings limit of six people. This does not mean that no more than six people can attend. There can be multiple groups of six people attending, provided that the social interaction and shared activity is limited to groups of six. Where this is unlikely to be possible, no more than six people should attend. Anybody who is attending for work purposes is excluded from the gatherings limit.

most midweek groups run by our church have both a social and a support element - the coffee morning which is the 1 piece of social contact in the week for an isolated elderly person, the cell group where people pray for each other and support each other in living out their faith, the baby and toddler group where mums can socialise and get out of the house. My reading of this is that all of this is covered by the above guidance, it can be done in groups of larger than 6, on church premises. The only question is whether they fall into groups 'covered by this exemption' (where a whole group of more than 6 can meet), or groups 'not covered by this exemption', where the whole group can meet but must be subdivided into groups of 6 or fewer, who don't interact with one another. 

3.19 Can I go to my hobby club / amateur musical group / other leisure activity?

It is against the law to gather in groups of more than six, where people are from different households or support bubbles. The rule above does not mean that there cannot be more than six people in any one place. All activities for under 18s are exempt. There can be multiple groups of six people in a place, provided that those groups do not mingle.

In practice, however, this will make it difficult for some activities to take place without breaking the law. Activities where there is a significant likelihood of groups of more than six mingling – and therefore breaking the law – should not take place until further COVID-19 Secure guidance has been developed and approved to enable the activity to happen safely. This may include extended tour groups, large banquet dinners, society or club meetings, or amateur music or drama rehearsals.

The grey area is what counts as a support group. Does it have to be primarily for support (e.g. AA), or with support as one of the collateral benefits? I guess if there's doubt, the group should be organised in clusters of up to 6, which is fairly easy to do with placing of chairs and tables. Not so easy to do with toddlers....

And what's the 'spiriit' of all this? Is it o try to find ways to facilitate groups meeting by interpreting the guidelines generously, or to be consservative and, where there is any doubt, keep the doors shut?

Tuesday, September 15, 2020

'Rule of 6' Guidance for Churches and Community Centres, part 2

 A follow on to last weeks post on how the new guidance affects places of worship. These are all direct extracts from government guidance published or updated yesterday, my commentary is in italics. 

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-guidance-for-the-safe-use-of-places-of-worship-during-the-pandemic-from-4-july/covid-19-guidance-for-the-safe-use-of-places-of-worship-during-the-pandemic-from-4-july updated 14th September

Gatherings of more than 30 people will be permitted but only in certain public places as set out in law. This will include places of worship and their surrounding premises. There are however activities where it is advisable to restrict numbers to 30 within a place of worship for public health reasons. This guidance sets out those activities as well as how to ensure your place of worship is COVID-19 secure.

Whilst engaging in an activity in the place of worship or surrounding grounds, all parties should adhere to social distancing guidelines. 2 metres or 1 metre with actions taken to reduce the risk of transmission (where 2 metres is not viable) between households are acceptable. For example, use of face coverings.

Communal worship, including prayers, devotions or meditations led by a Minister of Religion or lay person.

Limits for communal worship should be decided on the basis of the capacity of the place of worship following an assessment of risk (see Section 5 ‘Restrictions on Capacity’).

Social distancing should be strictly adhered to (see Section 5 ‘Social distancing’).

(No more than 30 in attendance at marriages, funerals and other life cycle events)

Where a place of worship’s premises is used by other user groups, only those activities permitted by law should take place. (refers to multi purpose community centre guidance

Outdoor worship

In the grounds of a place of worship

·         More than 30 people can pray in a place of worship or its grounds, but a risk assessment should be conducted and COVID-19 Secure measures implemented. The number of people who are able to gather will be dependent on the size of the space available.

 Not really any significant changes from the previous version

 

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-guidance-for-the-safe-use-of-places-of-worship-during-the-pandemic-from-4-july/special-religious-services-and-gatherings-covid-19-checklist

Communal worship or prayer can be attended by more than 30 people but only if the venues used can safely accommodate larger numbers in a way which complies with COVID-19 secure guidance. It is important that risks are managed sensibly. In line with wider Places of worship guidance

(so covid secure prayer meetings are ok)

 

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-guidance-for-the-safe-use-of-places-of-worship-during-the-pandemic-from-4-july/high-holy-day-services-and-gatherings-covid-19-checklist

4. Gathering outside

We know that prayers in the park and other outdoor spaces are an important feature of some festivals.

It is against the law in England to gather with more than 5 other people in private gardens. Gatherings in a public outdoor space are also against the law unless the gathering is exempt/ has been organised by a business, charity, a benevolent or philanthropic organisation or a public or political body applying COVID secure risk controls.

The organiser must have carried out a full risk assessment (there is advice on doing this in government’s Places of worship guidance) and taken all reasonable measures to limit the risk of transmission of coronavirus, including taking into account any relevant government guidance on gatherings.

Government guidance on Closing certain businesses and venues sets out how gatherings can be made COVID-19 Secure.

Local authorities will make decisions on applications for prayers in public places, including those on private land which is not attached to your place of worship. Councils will be putting the public health and safety needs of communities first when making these decisions.

This year to make sure that people are not putting themselves at risk of contracting COVID-19, where possible you should avoid attending large gatherings.

(would apply to remembrance, Christmas, and may enable larger gatherings than are possible inside church buildings, though there's a balancing act, as large gatherings are discouraged)

 

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-guidance-for-the-safe-use-of-multi-purpose-community-facilities/covid-19-guidance-for-the-safe-use-of-multi-purpose-community-facilities

updated 14th September

Managers of community facilities will have discretion over when they consider it safe to open for any activity permitted by legislation and may decide to remain closed if they are not able to safely follow the advice in the relevant guidance, to make the space COVID-19 secure.

Many community facilities are also workplaces and those responsible for the premises should therefore be aware of their responsibilities as employers. The government is clear that no one is obliged to work in an unsafe workplace.


Organisations also have a duty of care to volunteers to ensure as far as reasonably practicable they are not exposed to risks to their health and safety and are afforded the same level of protection as employees and the self-employed. See government information on coronavirus volunteering and how to help safely. Volunteers and other individuals who are shielding should continue to follow the government’s advice on shielding.

Anyone with control of non-domestic premises (such as a community centre, village or community hall) has legal responsibilities under health and safety law, and must take reasonable measures to ensure the premises, access to it, and any equipment or substances provided are safe for people using it, so far as is reasonably practicable.

To help decide which actions to take prior to re-opening the building for permitted activity, a COVID-19 risk assessment should be completed, taking account of the core guidance on social distancing and the points set out below. This will be in addition to any risk assessment which is already in place for the community facility.

 

2a: Social distancing and capacity

Measures should be in place to ensure all users of community facilities follow the guidelines on social distancing, including strict adherence to social distancing of 2 metres or 1 metre with risk mitigation (where 2 metres is not viable) are acceptable. You should consider and set out the mitigations you will introduce in your risk assessment.

The size and circumstance of the premises will determine the maximum number of people that can be accommodated while also facilitating social distancing. In defining the number of people that can reasonably follow 2 metres distancing (or 1 metre with risk mitigation), the total floorspace as well as likely pinch points and busy areas should be taken into account (e.g. entrances, exits) and where possible alternative or one-way routes introduced.

It is against the law for people to gather in a group of more than six, whether indoors or outdoors, unless covered by an exemption. This limit does not apply to meetings of a single household group or support bubble which is more than 6 people.

Community facilities following COVID-19 Secure guidance can host more than 6 people in total, but no one should visit or socialise in a group of greater than 6. Further information on social contact rules, social distancing and the exemptions that exist can be found on the guidance on meeting with others safely. These rules does not apply to workplaces or education settings, alongside other exemptions. See more details on what has changed.

Informal or formal adult social groups, clubs and activities can gather in groups no greater than 6 in adherence to social distancing rules. However, for activities where there is a significant likelihood of groups of six interacting, and therefore breaking the law, should not  take place in a community facility. Further details is set out in section 3c: Recreation, leisure and social gatherings

Support groups ( such as victim support and mental health groups) can take place in gatherings of any number (subject to capacity) in a COVID-19 secure community facility if organised by a business, a charitable, benevolent or philanthropic institution or a public body to provide mutual aid, therapy or any other form of support to its members or those who attend its meetings.

this may cover church small groups, who are a support group for church members. Does the baby and toddler group count as a support group for parents/carers, or a 'club' (see below)?

If partaking in permitted activities users of COVID-19 secure community facilities should limit their social interactions with anyone they do not live with. Whilst activities may have 6 or more people participating (where it is safe to do so and capacity permits) it is important for all parties to maintain socially distant, 2 metres or 1 metre with actions taken to reduce the risk of transmission (where 2 metres is not viable) between households. For example, use of face coverings and encouraging good hand hygiene on entering premises and throughout visit.

3c: Recreation, leisure and social gatherings

Managers and providers in community facilities are not permitted to organise or hold informal or formal social groups, clubs and activities unless limited to groups of six people following social distancing rules.

However, for activities and social groups where there is a significant likelihood of groups mixing and socialising ( and where it will be difficult to prevent mingling and therefore breaking the law) should not take place in a community facility. These may include but are not limited to:

·         formal or informal clubs and hobby clubs (e.g. women’s institute, veteran’s associations, freemasons, sewing clubs, book clubs, crafts clubs, reading groups)

·         amateur choirs and orchestras

·         informally organised sport activities on facilities grounds (professionally organised sport activities are exempt)

Community facilities following COVID-19 secure guidelines can run children groups and other youth activities, subject to their own capacity limits. See section 3a: Early years and youth provision for links to relevant guidance. It is, however, important for people to maintain social distancing and good hand hygiene when visiting these spaces.

People meeting in a club or group context at a community centre should be encouraged to socially distance from anyone they do not live with or who is not in their support bubble.

It's still not clear whether you can have an activity in a community centre where more than 6 people attend, but people are put in groups of up to 6 and not permitted to interact with other groups - e.g. you could do this for a coffee morning, knitting group etc. just by setting out tables and chairs in a safe layout and asking people to stay put during the session. 

Thursday, September 10, 2020

'Rule of 6' Guidance relating to places of worship and community Centres

Update (Fri pm), the CofE is still none the wiser:

 Last updated Friday 11 September at 9.30

The Government has announced that new regulations relating to the ‘rule of six’ are being prepared.

Those regulation will not come into effect until Monday September 14 2020.
Until then all of the advice below continues to apply as before.

The Church of England is engaging with the Government and will provide new advice to churches but we do not expect to be in a position to provide that until the week beginning September 14.                               


Here are excerpts from newly published government guidance on the 'rule of 6' and how it applies to churches and community settings. The web address below each section is the document it was taken from, so you can tack and trace sources. 

From 14 September, whether indoors or outdoors people from different households must not meet in groups of more than 6. This limit does not apply to meetings of a single household group or support bubble which is more than 6 people. Community facilities following COVID-19 secure guidelines can host more than 6 people in total, but no one should visit or socialise in a group of greater than 6. Further information on social contact rules, social distancing and the exemptions that exist can be found on the guidance on meeting with others safely. These rules will not apply to workplaces or education settings, alongside other exemptions. See more details on what has changed.

If partaking in permitted activities users of COVID-19 secure community facilities should limit their social interactions with anyone they do not live with. Whilst activities may have 30 or more people participating (where it is safe to do so and capacity permits) it is important for all parties to maintain socially distant, 2 metres or 1 metre with actions taken to reduce the risk of transmission (where 2 metres is not viable) between households. For example, use of face coverings and encouraging good hand hygiene on entering premises and throughout visit.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-guidance-for-the-safe-use-of-multi-purpose-community-facilities/covid-19-guidance-for-the-safe-use-of-multi-purpose-community-facilities

Limits on the number of people you can see socially are changing. From Monday 14 September, when meeting friends and family you do not live with you must not meet in a group of more than 6 indoors or outdoors.

From 14 September - when the new rules apply - it will be against the law to meet people you do not live with in a group larger than 6 (unless you are meeting as a household or support bubble). The police will have the powers to enforce these legal limits, including to issue fines (fixed penalty notice) of £100, doubling for further breaches up to a maximum of £3,200.

There will be exceptions where groups can be larger than 6 people, including:

·         where everyone lives together or is in the same support bubble, or to continue existing arrangements where children do not live in the same household as both their parents

·         for work, and voluntary or charitable services

·         for education, training, or registered childcare (including wraparound care)

·         fulfilling legal obligations such as attending court or jury service

·         providing emergency assistance, or providing support to a vulnerable person

·         for you or someone else to avoid illness, injury or harm

·         participate in children’s playgroups

·         wedding and civil partnership ceremonies and receptions, or for other religious life-cycle ceremonies - where up to 30 people will be able to attend

·         funerals - where up to 30 people will be able to attend

·         organised indoor and outdoor sports, physical activity and exercise classes (see the list of recreational team sportsoutdoor sport and exercise allowed under the gyms and leisure centre guidance

·         youth groups or activities

·         elite sporting competition or training

·         protests and political activities organised in compliance with COVID-19 secure guidance and subject to strict risk assessments

 

 

Venues following COVID-19 secure guidelines will be able to continue to host more people in total - such as religious services in places of worship - but no one should visit in a group of greater than 6. When you visit one of these places, such as a pub, shop, leisure venue, restaurant or place of worship you should:

·         follow the limits on the number of other people you should meet with as a group - no more than six people unless you all live together (or are in the same support bubble)

·         avoid social interaction with anyone outside the group you are with, even if you see other people you know

·         provide your contact details to the organiser so that you can be contacted if needed by the NHS Test and Trace programme

 

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-meeting-with-others-safely-social-distancing/coronavirus-covid-19-meeting-with-others-safely-social-distancing

 

 

2.1 Can I visit people indoors?

Yes.

From 14 September there will be a legal limit on the number of people you don’t live with you are able to meet. When meeting with people you don’t live with you can socialise in groups of up to 6.

You should continue to maintain social distancing with anyone you do not live with. 

2.4 Are children counted in the group of 6?

Yes.

2.8 Is there a limit on the number of people attending funerals?

The new legal gatherings limit of 6 people which will apply and come into force from 14 September does not apply to funerals.

Relevant premises will limit capacity based on how many people it can safely accommodate with social distancing in place, and we advise that funerals are limited to a maximum of 30 people.

The guidance on funerals can be found here.

2.9 Can weddings go ahead?

Yes, wedding ceremonies, civil partnerships and receptions (sit down meals in COVID-19 Secure venues) are allowed to take place. The new legal gatherings limit of 6 people which will apply and come into force from 14 September does not apply to weddings, civil partnerships and receptions.

 

2.11 Does this mean that no more than six people can be in a pub or restaurant at once?

Venues following COVID-19 Secure guidelines can host more than 6 people in total, but no one should visit in a group of greater than 6. When you visit one of these places, such as a pub, shop, leisure venue, restaurant or place of worship you should:

·         follow the limits on the number of other people you should meet with as a group (it will be illegal to be in group of more than six from outside of your household)

·         avoid social interaction with anyone outside the group you are with, even if you see other people you know

·         provide your contact details to the organiser so that you can be contacted if needed by the NHS Test and Trace programme

 

2.15 Can I gather in a group of more than 6 for childcare?

There is an exemption to the legal gatherings limit which comes into force on 14 September for the purposes of formal childcare provided by a registered provider. Family and friends can also provide informal childcare as long as groups from different households don’t exceed 6 people. Youth groups, wraparound childcare, including settings not formally registered (such as those providing after school clubs, breakfast clubs, sports clubs), and other children’s groups will also be allowed to continue.

3.10 Can I pray in a place of worship?

Yes, places of worship will stay open for services and communal prayer in line with guidance for reopening Places of Worship.

Places of worship can stay open for services for more than 6 people. However individual groups of more than one household or support bubble must not exceed 6 people.

You should limit your social interaction in these venues to the group you are attending with.

Strict adherence to social distancing is strongly advised and a distance of 2 metres (or 1 metre with additional COVID-19 Secure measures in place) should be kept from people you do not live with wherever possible.

3.11 Can I send my teenagers to their youth club?

Yes, you can. However, you should advise your children to maintain social distancing, wash their hands regularly and limit social interaction outside of these formal activities with anyone you do not live with.

The club should also follow COVID-19 Secure guidance.

 https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-outbreak-faqs-what-you-can-and-cant-do/coronavirus-outbreak-faqs-what-you-can-and-cant-do